Tension in the office can affect the performance of the parties involved and the morale of the other employees.

Workplace conflict and how to deal with it

Some industries are highly stressful or have high stakes. In these cases, workplace conflict is not uncommon. Yet, this tension in the office can affect the performance of the parties involved and the morale of the other employees. If you find yourself involved in conflict with a coworker, here are some tips for how to handle the situation: 

Decide if the situation is really worth the trouble
Before you actually make an issue of something, decide if it is worth it. Perhaps the comment that offended you was not made in malice or maybe the employee who stole your idea in a meeting did not know that you were going to suggest something similar. Evaluate the scenario carefully and without bias to ensure that you are not making something out of nothing. If the issue could be resolved with a quick clarifying conversation with the offending party, you are better off than if you enter into an argument. 

Do not gossip 
When people get frustrated, they have a tendency to seek emotional outlets. It can be tempting to find friends in the office to complain about the situation. Make an effort to keep the conflict between you and the other party. This will decrease the chance of an escalation of the situation. 

Wait until tensions have eased 
Before you confront the other person, make sure both you and the other parties have had a chance to let any strong feelings ebb. Anger, frustration and hurt feelings can impede judgment and make you say irrational things. When you have both had time to cool down, try approaching the matter with clearer heads. 

Workplace conflict affects more than just those involved, so understanding resolution methods can be extremely useful.Workplace conflict affects more than just those involved, so understanding resolution methods can be extremely useful.

Seek mediation if necessary 
Sometimes issues cannot be resolved by the two parties alone, and when this is the case, it can be beneficial to bring in a mediator. This person needs to be an impartial third party who will listen to both sides and determine the best course of action. It is usually best if the mediator is on the same level as the employees involved. If a mediator does not help the situation, the best thing to do is involve someone from human resources. 

Do not just talk; listen 
When people get angry or upset, they tend to only hear what they want to hear. If you find yourself involved with a conflict in your workplace, remember to actively listen to what the other party has to say. Instead of talking at them, try making it a dialog instead. When you are actually listening to what the other party has to say, you may be able to reach an agreement more easily. 

Workplace conflict can arise in even the most peaceful offices, but knowing how to handle it when it does can make things go much smoother. Try following the advice above to come to a resolution. For more workplace training tips, visit www.Syberworks.com today.